Imposter syndrome or Insecurity

First thank you for coming back…

For day 2 of the Winter African Blogging Challenge, I want to be a little bit unorthodox and maybe controversial as I push a school of thought. Hope I succeed for the good of creatives.

<a href="http://<blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our work/passions can't be our safe space forever, we need people at some point. At one point there those that will be better than us, younger, more creative, and flexible then we fall back to human unions we have made over time. Having a family does not guarantee those unions</p>— Musanjufu Benjamin (@Benjamin_Watch) <a href="https://twitter.com/Benjamin_Watch/status/1305935634004148225?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 15, 2020</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js&quot; charset="utf-8">Our work/passions can’t be our safe space forever, we need people at some point. At one point there those that will be better than us, younger, more creative, and flexible then we fall back to human unions we have made over time. Having a family does not guarantee those unions; Musanjufu Benjamin (@Benjamin_Watch) https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Before I go, further imposter syndrome is real and some creatives have gone on to take their lives because of it. Imposter syndrome endlessly induces non-anxious people to undergo a feeling of tension when they are in circumstances where they feel inferior.

There are several creatives amongst us who we celebrate and look up to. But they have another side deep within every fabric of their essence that feel like complete frauds, they further feel their accomplishments the result of advantageous luck.

I will not go into the various types of imposter syndrome, because I don’t think what creatives in Africa face is really it. Africa for a fact is raising, and creatives of all kinds are finding their footing In a fast-paced environment. At the same time African podcaster, bloggers, and other creatives have to make a mark on the world as we embrace globalization. A series of all these elements bring about insecurity over time.

Several creatives are self-made, you basically start a niche from thin air and you are the only one in it and dominating the space. A few years down the road people join in, you battle to stay relevant by taking advantage of dynamics. As a human being, if you ride solely which most Africans enjoy, you run out of fuel. You become stale. You are not open to sharing your experience because of the pride of entitlement. You are not open to collaboration because you despise the new ones. Before you know it you are holding onto a phrase “imposter syndrome” one that even academia has failed to agree on.

If you are creative with wings especially, try to spread them out in the bid to avoid the feeling of inadequacy. Being a perfectionist doesn’t help the situation but only makes it worse. So slow down and find a pace that gives you joy even in the face of deadlines. Don’t get into senseless disputes with fellow creatives even when they come at you. Don’t at any moment block new ones, let them be an opportunity to make your work fresh. Working with rookies will add something better, so collaborate. Be ready to change and let go, 20 years ago MTN was a telecommunications entity and today they are a financial institution of sorts.

When the sentiments of inadequacy come about fall back to friends who appreciate your creative values and being. Normally family doesn’t count, but if they understand maybe try them. Just like athletes who move from being at the center of a given sport and retire to coaching and management, if as a creative you don’t have that plan then you may as well as die from imagined imposter syndrome.

Hope I didn’t rant or just rumble because schools of thought take eternities to materialize.

21 thoughts on “Imposter syndrome or Insecurity

  1. Imposter syndrome is real. So many Afrobloggers started this challenge by questioning if they qualify! Yes, writers are creative. Even the ones with no followers yet here we are feeling inadequate

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Can I add the silent critique to the equation, some people feel inadequate because of that inner voice, the best way to beat it is by trusting a community like Afrobloggers and being part of it actively

    Like

  3. I think the Afrobloggers has done a very good job with regard to that.
    I’ve silently critiqued my work for a very long time until I joined the Afrobloggers community.
    Wordpress itself also helped in this regard. People are suportive out here

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Benjamin you are coming for our necks.

    I agree with you to some extent. I just think sometimes people don’t even understand what imposter syndrome is.
    It is very commonly mistaken for insecurity lol

    You present a good argument 😂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “…Being a perfectionist doesn’t help the situation but only makes it worse. So slow down and find a pace that gives you joy even in the face of deadlines.”

    Might be the best wisdom nugget I’ve picked this week.

    Liked by 1 person

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