Are the winds of Change blowing over Uganda or just populism

In the recent times we have seen those from outside political establishment shake up history for example in the United States Trump and is make America great chant enabled him systematically kill off seasoned politicians in his rise to the presidency of the great U.S.A. In France Emmanuel Macron an economic technocrat stormed his way to power without a political party backing  him and even made headlines of being the youngest leader in Europe till that Austria’s Sebastian Kurz came up.

Is Uganda a candidate of having a political outsider ? The pearl of Africa is designed in a special way compared to other places that have had outsiders come from no where and take over. (Not really from nowhere because these people don’t just wake up and decide to lead countries). However Uganda has had its share of experiencing a populist change in the political theater that brings us to where we are today. In the late 1980s in Africa we had our share of populism when a few African leaders made their way to power. Bill Clinton described them as the new promising generation of leaders meaning to their own people they had acquired a godlike status since they promised change and enjoyed support from the widest part of the societies they led. The support was so much that it overflowed to Washington D.C. These African leaders used populism to attain power and Yoweri Museveni of this Uganda was part of that group and they all went on to have the 30years in power sickness and constitutions have been amended from time to time through the shadow of populism.

The special designs of Uganda’s political theater take us back to 1962 when Buganda an ethnic grouping failed to take a firm hold on the leadership of Uganda. That failure has always seemed like a point of no return. For a while since then there has been a writing on the wall that Buganda can’t produce a leader for Uganda. But what happened back then if we are to time travel. The colonial masters organized an election of which the winner was to take up the leadership of Uganda but it did not produce the results that were wished for. The KY part (Kabaka Yeka) won the vote but did not secure the majority in parliament. So the Kabaka then Mutesa II the head of that party had the right to negotiate with other parties to form a government and move the beautiful country forward.

Kabaka Mutesa II as the head of KY part invited the democratic party head Benedick Kiwanuka to his palace for talks but nothing come out of the talks. According to Professor Taban Lo Liyong, a legend of East African literature Mr Kiwanuka refused to kneel before the Kabaka at the end the talks because  he was a catholic and he could not kneel before another human and the church was happy. The next day the Kabaka being a statesman invited Dr Milton Obote the head of the Uganda Peoples Congress (UPC) and according to the Professor Obote agreed to kneel and he was gifted the leadership of Uganda.

How would history have been if Buganda had taken up the leadership of Uganda ? Professor Taban Lo Liyong Says the whole of Uganda was disappointed, that much as the rest of Uganda hates Buganda but they fear and respect. Maybe because Buganda appeared to be more of a civilization in the region.

For the writing on the wall that Buganda can’t produce a leader for Uganda to be undone the catholic church has to play its role and the rise of Bobi Wine or Robert Kyagulanyi with his people power ideology offers them the best opportunity at the best of time since 1962. He belongs to Buganda and he is also a catholic, and political outsider too who seems to offer  political communication that set’s up the common people who may link him to populism only that he seems honest and has carefully distanced himself from the establishment.

There is also luck on Bobi Wine’s side, the by-election that brought him to parliament was lucky only that he was ready to take up the moment.  He managed to decisively beat up the ruling party and the seasoned opposition party that had the incubate for the parliamentary sit. After that election there come time for him taking the oath of office and it signaled a new down, which many down played as mare excitement from the Ugandans. Slowly Bobi Wine started to build a more conspicuous political mark around a very catchy slogan “people power, our power”, unmistakably dressing in red attire plus berets, emulating Julius Malema’s militant Economic Freedom Fighters party in South Africa

The evening after Bobi Wine taking his oath of office he went back to his constituency to address  his supporters and during that address he promised his wife to make first lady of Uganda one day. For now it seems it was just baby love since he has toned back from that ambition going with his interviews with talk to al jazeera, straight talk Africa and also the Stream were he made it clear that the president was not his goal but a free Uganda for every body no matter who is at the top but he made it clear that freedom can only come after change of regime.   BW1

Is Bobi Wine the Joshua in the political Odyssey of Uganda, so there is talk that Kizza Besigye is the Moses and his long and well fought fight is over. But others say its Bobi Wine who is the Moses and the Joshua is son to come. Is it delusional or its a game of time and waiting to see i Uganda can follow through. Those calling Bobi Wine the Moses surely undermine him and his camp, people power looks like an orphan in their eyes which can’t be entirely true. Bobi Wine and his camp are well-funded going by the 80 million shillings that they lost in Arua as they were being arrested in that by-election that gave him political mileage that is causing power-outages across the country.  They claimed the money was to facilitate their polling agents and it had come in from well-wishers. Who are the well-wishers ? Are they from Uganda ? Are they from outside Uganda ? Are they Ugandans from the diaspora ? If they are not Uganda’s what is their agenda ? There are many questions to ask about Bobi Wine. Many are focusing on Bobi Wine’s in terms of his moral, academic, and other experiential credentials in the bid to figure him out but these all fail to place him contextually within Uganda’s political landscape.

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After the west Nile events he rewrote his script in the eyes of all those who thought he was just a Moses. It could be seen, it could be heard, it could be sensed in various expressions on social media, on the streets, in places of worship and on radio, TV, buses, taxis and in homes. It’s was clear that the state was becoming aware of the potential for a violent public reaction to the brutality and poorly staged justification for blatant political persecution. In anticipation, there was a heavy deployment of police and soldiers bringing back the memory of the days at the pick and prime of FDC’s Besigye

At the moment apart from red attire plus berets that Bobi Wine is associated with, there is no connection to him with Economic Freedom Fighters party in the South of the continent, since it Ugandan branch is headed by Muyagwa also a member of parliament and also from the FDC party.

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Figuring out Bobi Wine as Robert Kyagulanyi is not as easy as those who are paid to down play him make it. He has the timing on his side, he has history written before him if he is to work withe right power brokers. His mission and motivation are not as clear as they seem now that the national money reserves are being emptied because of him. He is relatively young and many have jokingly likened him to the 27 for those who were there personally i  don’t believe in that part of history fully.

As Bobi Wine returns to the country after traveling for medical attention to Washington, where he even had a meeting at the State department who are also into the business of regime change, Ugandans have to wait and see his next move as he faces and battles charges of treason.

 


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